Beautiful 1957 GMC 100 Half Ton / Specs and More

The vehicle featured in this article is a beautifully restored 1957 GMC 100 Half Ton Pick Up Truck.

1957 gmc series 100 specs

1957 GMC Series 100 Pick Up

GMC Trucks

GMC as a truck brand was created out of a merger of the Reliance Motor Car Company and the Rapid Motor Vehicle Company within General Motors. GMC as a brand was officially introduced in 1912 at the New York International Auto Show. 

In 1912, GM built about 20,000 trucks.  Prior to the time of unveiling the GMC brand, trucks from GM were produced by both the Reliance and the Rapid companies. By 1913 all GMC truck production was performed at the Rapid Motor Vehicle Company plant in Pontiac, Michigan. Three years later in 1916 General Motors officially created the GMC Truck Division.

GMC trucks were usually sold by GM dealerships that also offered Buick, Pontiac or Oldsmobile models. The Chevrolet truck was sold exclusively by Chevrolet dealers. While the GMC and Chevrolet trucks may at times look identical there are differences in the trucks, some significant over during the latter years.

task force gmc pick up trucksBy the second decade of the twentieth century the Chevrolet brand and the GMC brand trucks looked very similar in appearance.  During those early years Chevrolet was marketing their trucks to individuals while GMC was targeted to commercial buyers.

GMC did quite a lot of business with the military during World War Two. An interesting fact from this period is that the first HydraMatic transmission GMC vehicle was made for the military in 1944. Another fact is that GMC frames were built with heavier gauge steel than Chevy trucks.

The Task Force 1957 GMC 100 Half Ton

The 1957 GMC light duty trucks were second generation called  "Task Force" models. These replaced the "Advance Design" trucks beginning in 1955. GMC "Task Force" generation trucks offered 12 volt electrical and the first V-8.

Design changes for the 1957 model year helped give the GMC 100 a family car look while still being a tough worker of a pick up. The new 57's featured a wraparound windshield, two-tone trim and clean lines that included a flatter hood than on previous year's models. GMC 100 models were available in step-side or smooth-sided models. The "step-side has a rear fender well bulge toward the outside of the truck bed.

Options included electric windshield wipers, Hydra-Matic transmission, power steering, tinted glass and four-wheel drive.

1957 GMC Series 100 Specifications

Standard in the 57 GMC 100 was a 269 cubic inch inline six cylinder engine delivering 130 horsepower. More muscle was available. Offered as an option was a 206 HP V-8.

Gearbox was a three speed manual with an automatic available as an option.

Brakes were four wheel hydraulic drum.

The 1957 GMC Series 100 has a 114.0 inch wheelbase. New base price was about $1,950.

You may also be interested in additional Auto Museum Online articles found on the links below...

The 1949 GMC Five Window Pick Up

The 1949 GMC Suburban Wagon

1957 gmc light weight truckReferences for this article included the GM and GMC archive collection. For a good deal of additional GMC Truck information along with forums check out www.gmctruckclub.com

GMC Pick Up Collector Trucks

GMC Pickups from the post World War Two era have been popular collector vehicles and some fully restored examples, like the GMC 100 featured in this article, look absolutely stunning.

For the 1957 model year GMC produced three basic light duty pick up models. These were the Series 100 half-ton models like the one in this article. The others were the Series 150 three-quarter ton and the Series 250 one-ton. Major front end design changes occurred with the 1959 models. Also, the light duty trucks all took on the name Apache beginning in 1958. Among the front end design changes for 1958 were four headlights instead of two.

gmc series 100 dashboard

57 GMC 100 dashboard

Current price ranges for the 1957 GMC Series 100 run from $10,000 to about $25,000. Exact prices will reflect overall condition, mileage and original matching parts. Highest valued Series 100 for 1957 is the Suburban Pick Up. Here you may see prices ranging from $15,000 to $45,000 plus depending on the usual factors.

Highest prices are generally for fully restored, excellent overall condition, and highly original matching part models.

(Article and photos copyright Auto Museum Online)

1949 GMC “100” 5-window Pickup / Specs, Photos, History

Who built the first pickup truck? Auto historians might say it originated in Germany when Gottlieb Daimler invented what he called vehicle no. 42. This automobile provided the first truck concept as a horseless wagon with a 4 hp, 1.1 L, 2 cylinder engine. Daimler's new creation was advertised to pull 3300 pounds, although some disagreed with that claim.

Our featured vehicle in this article is a 1949 GMC Series 100 Half-Ton  5-Window Pickup..

1949 gmc half ton

1949 GMC Half Ton

GMC Created Within General Motors

In 1909, GM purchased a truck company to develop General Motors Truck Company, which became GMC Truck. GMC is the brand name for trucks, vans and SUVs sold by General Motors.

GMC as a truck brand was created out of both the Reliance Motor Car Company and the Rapid Motor Vehicle Company within GM. The GMC brand was officially introduced in 1912 at the New York International Auto Show. .In 1912, GM produced about 20,000 trucks.  Prior to the time of unveiling the GMC brand, trucks from GM were produced from the merger of both the Reliance and the Rapid companies. By 1913 all GMC truck production was done at the Rapid Motor Vehicle Company plant in Pontiac, Michigan. By 1916 General Motors created the GMC Truck Division.

gmc half ton pickup photosChevrolet was also building trucks for General Motors and by the year 1920 the Chevrolet brand and the GMC brand trucks looked almost identical except for their grilles. During those years Chevrolet was marketing their trucks to individuals while GMC targeted commercial buyers.

GMC trucks were assembled at the main GMC truck plant in Pontiac, Michigan from 1939 to 1950

GMC trucks were typically sold by GM dealerships that offered Buick, Pontiac or Oldsmobile automobiles. The Chevrolet truck was sold by Chevrolet dealers. While the GMC and Chevrolet trucks may look identical there are differences in the trucks, some significant over the years.

Pickup Trucks Popularity After the War

The US government halted the production of consumer trucks during World War II. GMC however was a main supplier of military vehicles to U.S. and Allied governments. The most outstanding of those vehicles were the GMC model CCKW350 series, 2 ½-ton truck. These trucks delivered 92 hp with GMC 270 cubic inch inline 6-cylinder engines coupled with 5-speed transmissions. Some of the first GMC 6x6s saw action in North Africa against Rommel’s German desert army.

Automakers dramatically increased their pickup truck production following World War II.  After the war was over, Chevrolet and GMC set a new trend for pickups by releasing the first ever three-man seat pickup that featured a larger cab, bigger windows, and higher seats, and other manufacturers followed suit. GMC benefited from the increased popularity of pickup trucks after the end of the war. In fact, during the 1950's pickup trucks actually became a status symbol and many are considered in that way today.

1949 GMC Pickup Truck

As far as design is concerned, the 1949 GMC Pickups were largely what was seen on the 48 models. The entire GMC line included 75 different models from 4,600 through 75,000 lbs. There were 224 body and chassis types, powered by a variety of 9 GMC built engines.

Two years prior in 1947 GMC trucks restyled Chevrolet featured the new “Advance Design" cabs. This was a total departure from the prewar truck line. Cabs were larger and more comfortable with a larger glass area, standard dual windshield wipers, improved insulation and much better seats.

gmc advanced design pickups1949 GMC Series 100 Specifications

Standard power plant for the 1949 GMC Series 100 Pickup was a 228 cubic inch Inline Six Cylinder engine. Horsepower was rates at 95. Back in 1939 GMC replaced the Pontiac 223 with their own  228 in 1939. This engine was utilized in the GMC Pickup through the 1953 model year.

Standard transmission on this GMC Pickup was a column mounted three speed manual.

The half-ton models featuring either the Deluxe Cab or standard cab configurations had 116-inch wheelbases. The overall body measured 196.5 inches long.

GMC advertised their 1949 pickup trucks as including heavy duty frames, ball bearing steering, Hydrovac power brakes, synchromesh gear box and adjustable seats. The trucks generally were touted for their strength and durability, especially with heavy loads.

Total GMC Truck production for the 1949 model year was 83,800 units.

You may also be interested in the Auto Museum Online articles on the links below...

A Finely Restored 1949 GMC Suburban

1937 GMC COE

The 1955 Studebaker Pickup

Probably the best reference book you can find pertaining to the history of GMC Trucks is...GMC: The First 100 Years by author John Gunnell.

gmc dashboard photos

49 GMC dashboard

1949 GMC Pickup Truck Collector Values

GMC Pickups from this era are popular collector vehicles and some fully restored examples look absolutely great.

Current valuations for the 1949 GMC Half Ton based on several independent sources range from about $22,000-$27,000. This range would be for a fully restored model in excellent condition inside and out..

(Article and photos copyright 2016 Auto Museum Online)

1937 GMC Cab Over Truck / Chevy 454 Engine

Vintage GMC Cab Over trucks are rare. The truck featured in this article is a 1937 GMC COE with a Chevy 454 engine that could make a great restoration project.

1937 gmc coe

1937 GMC COE

Mergers and the Creation of GMC

General Motors was founded by William Durant in 1908. Later that same year Durant started to buy stock in and takeover the Reliance Motor Car Company and Max and Morris Grabowsky's Rapid Motor Vehicle Company. The Grabowsky brothers built their first prototype truck in 1900.

GMC as a truck brand was created out of both the Reliance Motor Car Company and the Rapid Motor Vehicle Company within GM. The GMC brand was officially introduced in 1912 at the New York International Auto Show. .In 1912, GM produced about 20,000 trucks.  Prior to the time of unveiling the GMC brand, trucks from GM were produced from the merger of both the Reliance and the Rapid companies. By 1913 all GMC truck production was done at the Rapid Motor Vehicle Company plant in Pontiac, Michigan. By 1916 General Motors created the GMC Truck Division.

Two events in 1916 helped publicize General Motors relatively new truck division. In 1916 a GMC truck traveled from Seattle to New York in just over 30 days. In 1930 another  GMC truck drove from New York to San Francisco in 5 days and 30 minutes. Such were the technological advancements made from 1916 to 1930.

Chevrolet was also building trucks for General Motors and by the year 1920 the Chevrolet brand and the GMC brand trucks looked almost identical except for their grilles. During those years Chevrolet was marketing their trucks to individuals while GMC targeted commercial buyers.

The GMC brand obviously is one of the few that started in the first decade of the 1900's and is still a popular name today. Today, the GMC brand is over 100 years old.  To give you an idea of GMC production during it’s very early years, a total of 759 GMC trucks of Rapid and Reliance designs were built from 1913 through 1915.

The 1937 GMC COE

The first GMC Cab Over Engine truck was produced for the 1934 model year. General Motors introduced 11 COE models in 1937. In that same year GMC introduced their first Suburban Carryall utility vehicle. This was the model that would later become the GMC Yukon XL.

As far as pickup trucks of the 1930's is concerned, the primary difference between the GMC and Chevrolet models was in the trim. Another interesting fact about the pickups was that the beds on 34 to 39 Chevys interchanged with 36 to 39 GMCs. The GMC's are the rarer models.

1937 GMC Cab Over's were used as tanker trucks, flat bed haulers, tow trucks, trailer pullers, beer trucks and more. There were 1930's GMC COE Tow Trucks with 20,000 lb winches. A company named the Ranier Breing Company at one time owned ten 1937 GMC COE beer trucks. It's said that there is one in existence today.

See additional AutoMuseumOnline articles on the links below...

A Finely Restored 1949 GMC Suburban

A 1955 Studebaker Pickup Truck

A 1962 Studebaker Champ Pickup Truck

1937 gmc trucks

Grille on the 1937 GMC COE

Values of the 1930's GMC Cab Over Engine Trucks

If you're looking to pick up a 1937 GMC COE, there are typically not a large number on the market. There are some that have been restored and others offered that are the cab unit only.

There was a project vehicle that would need a total restoration from top to bottom offered at $2,300. Another full restoration project vehicle is a 37 GMC COE that was once used as a water truck listed at $3,000. A 37 GMC cab only was listed at $1,600. A totally restored 37 GMC COE that is between show and cruise condition was offered at $50,000.

1937 GMC dashboard

Dashboard on the 37 GMC COE

An interesting website you might visit when searching for 1930's GMC COE project vehicles is .....http://www.madchrome.com/vintage-car-junk-yards-wrecking-yards.html

Our reference material and an excellent book is…..GMC : The First 100 Years by author John Gunnell. Another excellent book includes…..The Deal Maker : How William C. Durant Made General Motors by author Axel Madsen.

(Article and photos copyright AutoMuseumOnline)