1954 Nash Statesman Custom Farina / Specs, Photos, More

The great looking automobile featured in the article is the 1954 Nash Statesman Custom Farina Sedan. The Nash Statesman was manufactured by Nash Motors for the 1950-1956 model years. Nash positioned the Statesman mid level above the Rambler and below the Ambassador. The 1954 Nash Statesman was of the second generation models, 1952-1956.

1954 nash statesman

1954 Nash Statesman Custom

Nash Motors History

Charles Nash began building automobiles as early as 1903 and formed Nash Motors in 1916. Part of the early Nash history is that... the Mitchell Motor Car Company of Racine Wisconsin was acquired by Nash in 1923. Mitchell had been producing cars for twenty years under the Mitchell brand.

Nash Motors also went on to acquire Lafayette Motors in 1924. After beginning business in 1920 the company's majority stock was picked up by Nash Motors in 1924.

When Nash Motors was formed in 1916 World War One was not far away and during this war Nash was the largest truck builder in the United States. Over the next several decades Nash Motors would grow much larger due to several mergers and acquisitions some of which have already been mentioned.

Charles Nash was credited for two big accomplishments. He was able to keep his company competitive during the Roaring Twenties when competition was growing rapidly and Nash also was able to keep the company going through the Great Depression years of the 1930′s.

nash motors statesman

Nash covered wheel wells and somewhat bulky yet elegant design

In 1954 Nash-Kelvinator merged with the Hudson Motor Car Company which was then formed as American Motors Corporation.

Of special note is that Nash introduced the industry’s first heating/air conditioning system using a single unit within the engine bay.

The Nash Statesman

Nash put designer Pininfarina of Italy on contract to design the new 1952 Statesman model. The car was produced in three models...the Two Door Sedan, the Four Door Sedan and the Two Door Coupe. The finished design actually ended up being a combination of a Nash in-house and Pinonfarina design. These were popular automobiles and many were purchased by police departments across the U.S. Because of the Statesman's lighter weight, the car had very good fuel economy.

The last of the Nash Statesman models were produced in August, 1956. Starting in 1957 all full-size Nash cars were Ambassadors.

1954 Nash Statesman Specifications

The 54 Nash Statesman came with a 196 Cubic Inch L:-Head Inline Six engine delivering 110 horsepower. While this type engine was used for many years by Nash, the 1954 model had the highest compression to date as well as sharing the highest U.S. stock car compression with Buick. Nash eliminated the cast iron head and replaced it with a high compression aluminum one. The aluminum head  dissipates heat faster than the iron one.

Transmission was a three speed manual.

Brakes were four wheel hydraulic drum. The front brake shoes were widened from 2 to 2 1/2 inch for 1954.

The Statesman rode on 114.3-inch wheelbase. Overall length of the model was 202.3 inches with the continental kits increasing that to 219 inches. Width 78.0 inches and height 61.75 inches. The top of the line Nash Ambassador had a 7 inch longer wheelbase. Estimated curb weight was 3,300 lbs.

See additional Auto Museum Online articles on the links below...

Restored 1948 Nash Ambassador Cabriolet

The 1927 Nash Sedan

1929 Nash Advanced Six Rumbleseat Coupe

nash statesman continental kit

54 Nash Continental kit

A few excellent books on the subject of Nash Motors and other independents include Storied Independent Automakers : Nash, Hudson and American Motors by author Charles K. Hyde... Nash: 1936-1957 Photo Archive by Byron Olsen and Charles Nash : From Buick To Rambler and Ambassador by Daniel Alef.

Nash Collector Cars and Values

During the early 1950's both the Nash Ambassador and Statesman models were volume and profit leaders for Nash.

nash statesman dashboardWhen you look at a model such as the 1954 Nash Farina Statesman Custom Airflyte sedan it appears somewhat bulky but it also has an elegant touch and the Continental kit, while there is some disagreement on what it adds to a car, it's our opinion that with it's rear spare tire it does add class. The Nash Statesman is a popular collector car and some of the fully restored models like the one featured here make good cars to begin a collection with. There are many automobile enthusiasts that are real fans of the old independents such as Nash.

The automobile model featured in this article has a valuation in the area of $15,000 with $20,000 plus being at the high retail end.

(Article and photos copyright Auto Museum Online)

 

 

 

 

A Restored 1948 Nash Ambassador Custom Cabriolet

The 1948 Nash Ambassador Custom Cabriolet is a rare collector automobile. The Ambassador model featured in this article was Nash's top of the line car in 1948. It also wasn't until a year later in 1949 that Nash came out with their first new post war design called the Airflyte models.

1948 nash ambassador cabriolet

1948 Nash Ambassador Custom Cabriolet

Nash Motors

Charles Nash began building automobiles as early as 1903 and formed Nash Motors in 1916. World War One was not far away and during this war Nash was the largest truck builder in the United States. Over the next several decades Nash Motors would grow much larger due to several mergers and acquisitions.

Nash Motors had an excellent slogan they adopted in the late 1920′s. The slogan was simply “Give the customer more than he has paid for“. The Nash automobiles pretty much lived up to that slogan. They were quality automobiles. It was said that Nash sold their cars about as fast as they could be produced.

Charles Nash was credited for two big accomplishments. He was able to keep his company competitive during the Roaring Twenties when competition was growing rapidly and Nash also was able to keep the company going through the Great Depression years of the 1930′s. This was no easy task since many companies went out of business in the 1930′s.

1948 nash cabriolet

1948 Nash Cabriolet

In 1937 Charles Nash  merged his company with the Kelvinator Corporation. By the time of the merger Charles Nash was 73 years of age and the merger made business sense. Nash became chairman of Nash-Kelvinator Corporation and kept that title until he died in 1948.

In 1954 Nash-Kelvinator merged with the Hudson Motor Car Company which was then formed as American Motors Corporation. Beginning in 1956 AMC started building the Nash Ramblers. This was an attempt to serve the smaller, more economical auto market and the timing worked pretty well. The Nash Ramblers built a good reputation for dependability and they were inexpensive to own and operate. They also built a Rambler convertible. While the last Nash was produced in 1957, the Rambler model continued on with American Motors. The Rambler was discontinued in 1969.

1948 nash ambassador

1948 Nash Ambassador rear quarter panel styling. Similar to 1942 models.

Nash Ambassador Design

Coming out one year prior to the new post war Airflyte design, the 48 Nash had many of the styling traits of the pre war 1942 Nash cars. This included the split windshield and the front and back fender lines. Take a look at the 1949 Nash Airflyte Ambassador and you'll see an entirely new design.

1948 Nash Ambassador Specifications

The 1949 Nash Ambassador Custom Cabriolet came with a 235 cubic inch inline six cylinder engine delivering 112 horsepower.

Transmission was a three speed manual and brakes were four wheel hydraulic drum.

Suspension on the 1948 Nash Ambassador included front end independent coil springs and rear end semi-elliptic leaf springs.

1948 nash ambassador grille

Nash Ambassador grille closeup

Dimensions included a wheelbase of 121.0 inches, an overall outside length of 208.575 inches, a width of 75.375 inches and a height of 69.25 inches. Weight came in at 3,465 lbs. New car price for the Ambassador Custom Cabriolet was about $2,345. For a comparison, a 1948 Hudson Super Eight sold new for just about the same price of $2,300  The Hudson Super Eight was not top of the line however. The Hudson Commodore Eight had a new price tag in the range of $2,600 to $3,000.

See these AutoMuseumOnline articles on the links below...

A 1927 Nash Sedan

1929 Nash Advanced Six With Rumble Seat

A Restored 1949 De Soto Custom Club Coupe

The 1950 Willys Station Wagon

1962 Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawk

A few excellent books on the subject of Nash Motors and other independents include Storied Independent Automakers : Nash, Hudson and American Motors by author Charles K. Hyde... Nash: 1936-1957 Photo Archive by Byron Olsen and Charles Nash : From Buick To Rambler and Ambassador by Daniel Alef.

nash emblem

1948 Nash Emblem

Total Nash 1948 production was 110,000 vehicles. To give you an idea of just how rare the 48 Nash Ambassador Custom Cabriolet is, according to the Complete Book of Collectible Cars, only 1,000 of these convertible vehicles were built. Not counting the later Ramblers, the 1948 Ambassador Custom Cabriolet was the first and last post war rag top.

Look for the 1949 Nash serial number under the hood on the cowl.

1948 Nash Ambassador Custom Cabriolet Collector Car Values

As mentioned above, the 1948 Nash Ambassador Cabriolets are scarce collector cars with only 1,000 being manufactured. The rag top also makes this model a milestone car. Beginning with the 1949 Nash models the designing was all different.

Nash automobile owners have a lot of resources available through the Nash Car Club of America. Members receive a Nash part interchange book, a searchable bibliography of more than a thousand articles about Nash and related vehicles

You'll find that the Ambassador Custom Cabriolets have steadily increased in value over the decades. The convertible models have sold at auction for north of $50,000. We have seen a museum condition model with total originality with an asking price above $100,000.

(Article and photos copyright 2014 AutoMuseumOnline)

 

1927 Nash Sedan

 

The automobile featured in this photo article is the 1927 Nash Sedan. Nash Motors was having a fairly good year during 1927 having produced some 122,600 passenger vehicles for that model year.

1927 Nash Sedan

1927 Nash Sedan

Nash Motors had an excellent slogan they adopted in the late 1920's. The slogan was simply "Give the customer more than he has paid for". The Nash automobiles pretty much lived up to that slogan. They were quality automobiles. It was said that Nash sold their cars about as fast as they could be produced. As a side note, Nash Motors came out with an Advanced Six Cabriolet in 1927 that was received well.

A Car With Style

The 1927 Nash Advanced Six was not necessarily a car for the masses. Advertising for the 1927 Nash Advanced Six cars emphasized style and fashion. Walnut finished dashboards including a walnut finished steering wheel and mohair upholstery were touted.

Not to only highlight it's fashionable attributes, Nash Motors also touted it's seven bearing inline six cylinder engine which was advertised to be smooth and quiet. Steering was advertised to be smooth and easy at every turn.

1927 Nash Six Sedan

1927 Nash Six Sedan

The 1927 Nash Sedan was said by Nash Motors to be the kind of car that would stand out from the rest. The advertising essentially pushed the fact that the 1927 Nash was not only a great looking car that you'd impress people with but also a mechanically superior automobile. Nash Motors further stated that the car buying public could enjoy this type of quality at a moderate price.

As a side note, in the 1930's Nash Motors acquired a reputation for innovation as opposed to Ford which made innovations much more slowly. An example of a unique Nash innovation was the 1936 Bed-In-A-Car offering. This Nash model allowed the car's interior to be reconfigured into a sleeping compartment. Essentially, the back seats could be folded in such a way to produced a double bed. This was meant to be a custom feature in all Nash cars. Nash claimed that the interior reconfiguration would take only five minutes to complete.

1927 Nash

1927 Nash

The 1920's Acquisitions that Made Nash Motors

Nash Motors was founded in 1916 by Charles W. Nash who had been president of General Motors. Nash took over the Thomas B. Jeffrey Company which had been struggling to survive. The Thomas B. Jeffrey Company was most noted for it's Rambler automobile which was introduced as early as 1902.  After the acquisition, the company’s name was changed to Nash Motors and it was able to do quite well as a niche automotive producer.

The Mitchell Motor Car Company of Racine Wisconsin was acquired by Nash in 1923. Mitchell had been producing cars for twenty years under the Mitchell brand. Nash Motors also went on to acquire Lafayette Motors in 1924. After beginning business in 1920 the company's majority stock was picked up by Nash Motors in 1924.

1927 Nash Advanced Six Sedan

1927 Nash Advanced Six Sedan

The Lafayette car plants were converted to produce Ajax automobiles. Only about a year later it was determined that Ajax cars, although entry level cars, were not selling well. Nash felt that the car would have sold better if only it had the Nash name. As a result, conversion kits were sold to make the Ajax look like a Nash Light Six. The Ajax brand had a very short life. Interestingly, even when the Ajax was faltering,1925 would turn out to be a record year to date for Nash Motors. Nash Motors went on to reintroduce the Lafayette car brand in 1934.

Links below are to additional AutoMuseumOnline articles you'll enjoy.

1929 Nash Advanced Six

1927 Studebaker

1927 Nash Light Six Sedan Specifications

The 1927 Nash Sedan came with an L-Head 170 cubic inch, six cylinder engine delivering 21.6 horsepower.

The car's wheelbase was 108.0 inches. Suspension were semi-elliptic leaf springs.

This was a four door model seating five. The transmission was a three speed manual.

The base price of the 1927 Nash Light Six Sedan was just under $1,000.

(Article and photos copyright 2013 AutoMuseumOnline)