1956 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup

 

The restored and modified 1956 Chevy 3100 Pickup featured in this article is a very fine looking vehicle. The Chevy Pickup Trucks went through major design changes starting in 1955 the same as with the passenger non-truck models of that year. As most people are well aware, the 1955 through 1957 Chevrolets were quite popular then and are very popular now as collector cars.

1956 Chevy 3100 Series

1956 Chevy 3100 Series

Chevrolet called the new style for 1955 as the "Task Force Design". This name replaced the previous designation of "Advance Design" which ran from 1947 until 1955. During this time Chevrolet trucks were outselling Ford until Ford came out with their V-8 truck engine in 1954. Chevy came out with their truck V-8 engine in 1955 along with their new Task Force design. The Task Force Chevys lasted from 1955 to 1959 at which time new body styling and other improvements were designated as the "C" models beginning with the 1960 model year.

The most sought after truck in this new line was the half-ton 3100 Series. The 1956 Chevy 3100 Pickup was very much the same truck as the 1955 model. The new design for the 1955 model carried over to 1956 included sculpted door and fender panels and a lower flatter hood. All Task Force series Chevy trucks were built with rugged chassis and drive trains.

Chevrolet Task Force Trucks

Chevrolet Task Force Trucks

Trucks Become Stylish

For many years not a whole lot of interest was put in truck design in regards to being stylish. The selling point for trucks was, and really still is, their utility. Heavier truck makers, especially Diamond T,  did indeed make good looking trucks beginning in the 1930's, but with the major automakers, real close attention to styling came in the middle of the 1950's.

Chevy's 3100 Series beginning in 1955 changed all that. When the Chevy 3100 trucks came out they actually to some seemed like a cross between truck and passenger car. Everything with the Chevrolet 3100 was designed new from the front to back including a new wrap around windshield. This was the industry's first such windshield. Ads for Chevrolet that year referred to it as a "Sweep-Sight Windshield". Stand back and look at the 1956 Chevy 3100 and you'll see a hint of racing styling. The 1957 models of the 3100 Series offered a few more colors along with some trim changes.

1956 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup dash

1956 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup dash

1956 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup Truck Specifications

The 1956 Chevy 3100 Pickup came out with a base 235.5 cid straight six cylinder engine delivering 123 horsepower. Buyers had the option for a 265 cid V-8 that could deliver 154 horsepower. In 1956 the Chevrolet engineers added some things to the 265 V-8. This included an optional four barrel carburetor which increased horsepower to 205.

The transmission was a manual three speed with buyers having the option of a hydramatic automatic unit.

Two wheelbases were offered to buyers. The standard which was 114.0 inches and the extended which was 123.0 inches.

The front axle on two wheel drive trucks is an I-beam type mounted on leaf springs.

Cargo beds for the Chevrolet 3100 Series were offered as six, seven or eight foot lengths.

See additional AutoMuseumOnline classic trucks on the links below.

1937 Diamond T Pickup

1941 Chevy Half-Ton Pickup

1935 Chevrolet Half-Ton Truck

1956 Chevy Pickup

1956 Chevy Pickup

 

The Chevy 3100 Series Pickups are Popular Collector Cars.

The 1956 Chevrolet Pickups along with all of the Task Force design models are popular with collectors and there have been some terrific restoration jobs done on them. Collectors of light trucks and hot rods love the 3100 Series Chevy Trucks because of the body style. Parts for restoration are readily available for the Chevy Task Force trucks so they make restoration projects popular.

As of this writing car auction prices for Task Force Series Chevy pickup trucks have been strong. Selling prices being offered depending on level of restoration have ranged from the high teens to the $40,000 plus range. Some lesser restored models will be below that range. One finely restored model sold at auction for $110,000.

(Article and photos copyright 2013 AutoMuseumOnline)

Classic Chevrolet Impala

 

Featured in this article is the 1964 Chevrolet Impala.

1964 Chevy Impala

1964 Chevy Impala

A Sporty Looking Full Size Car

The Chevy Impalas are some of the more classic Chevys of the 1960's. Not that General Motors didn't have several popular cars during that decade such as the Pontiac GTO but the Chevrolet Impala had it's own large following of car buyers.

The 1964 Chevrolet Impala was among the third generation of Impalas which represented the 1961 through 1964 models. The Chevrolet Impala first came on the market during the 1958 model year. This was the 1958 Chevrolet Bel Air Impala. Just one year later in 1959 the Impala series would become entirely separate from the Chevy Bel Air.The Impala had good success during it's 1958 introduction and helped Chevrolet immensely during what was a recession year.

1964 Chevrolet Impala

1964 Chevrolet Impala

The 1958 Chevrolet Impala design was a departure from Chevy's mostly conservative designs of prior years. The longer rear deck gave the appearance of a longer automobile. When you look at the 1958 Impala and compare it to earlier 50's Chevy's you'll see a car that looks longer, lower and even wider. This design trait would stay with Chevy for years to come. To some it might appear to be a large muscle car.

The Chevy Designs of 1958

The first 1958 Impala sported a new chassis as well as the introduction of dual headlights. Interestingly enough, when the Chevy Impala's came out the auto design world was caught up with chrome and fins. Probably the best example of maximum fin usage on an American car was with the 1959 Cadillac. When 1960 came around Chevrolet decided to tone things down a bit with the fins. The 1959 and 1960 Impalas represented the second generation. Take a look at 1961 through 1964 Chevy Impalas and you'll easily see the more conservative design that was put in place. Any resemblance of fins was phased out.

1964 Impala dashboard

1964 Impala dashboard

In 1964 the Chevrolet Impala, like the one shown here, featured squared styling along with top performance and was the second highest priced Chevy on their list of offered models. This was one of Chevrolet's full sized offerings yet with a sporty appeal. The big block V-8's offered with the SS models helped add the muscle.

Difference Between 1964 Chevy Impala and Super Sport Impala

The Super Sport Impala was essentially a high performance version of the Impala with custom trim such as bucket seats, exterior trim like the SS emblem, a V8 engine and custom side trim. The body in all other respects were the same between the two models. More available options, more exterior chrome trim and generally a nicer interior came with the Impala Super Sport. The SS badge was to become Chevrolet's signature of performance on many models although over the years the SS designation wasn't necessarily Chevrolet's top performance vehicle.

1964 Chevy Impala Specifications

Both a six cylinder V-8 and eight cylinder V-8 engine were available for the 1964 Chevy Impala. The six was a Turbo Thrift 230 cid delivering 140 horsepower. The eight's that were available were either a 283, 327 or 409 cid delivering anything between 195 and 425 horsepower. The Super Sport Impalas almost always came with the V-8's. It was very uncommon to see the standard six cylinder engine on those models. If you wanted the Super Sport model you wanted the V-8.

Chevy Impala

Chevy Impala

The 1964 Chevy Impalas total length was 210.4 inches and it's wheelbase 119.0 inches. Vehicle weight averaged between 3,500 to #,800 lbs.
Production of 1964 Impala's totaled 889,000 units. Out of that number, 185,523 of those were the Super Sport Impalas.

Buyers had an option of three transmissions with 1964 Impala. These were Turboglide, Powerglide or Overdrive Synchro-Mesh.

New car price for the 1964 Chevrolet Impala was around $3,000 depending on options. Chevrolet believed that the Impala's reasonable price allowed the average car buyer to own something prestigious.

Links below are to additional AutoMuseumOnline photo articles you'll enjoy.

1955 Chevy Bel Air

1958 Chevy Impala Convertible

1964 Chevy Impala Emblem

1964 Chevy Impala Emblem

 

The 1964 Chevy Impala Collector's Car

The early Chevy Impalas, 1958 to 1964, turned out to be perhaps the most popular collector's cars since the Bel Airs of 1955 to 1957. That 1957 Chevy will perhaps always remain a top classic car.

Finely restored 1964 Chevrolet Impalas have seen collector bids in a range from the high teens to the $30,000 plus range. Excellently restored Super Sport models will get the better bids. For those 1964 Chevy Impalas that aren't in running condition you'll probably be able to get something well below $10,000. If it's not running and in bad general condition you might find yourself with a great start to a Chevy restoration project. Restoration projects for the third generation Impalas are helped by the fact that parts are relatively easy to find.

(Article and photos copyright 2013 AutoMuseumOnline)

1937 Diamond T Pickup Truck

 

The Diamond T Motor Car Company was a  Chicago Illinois automobile manufacturer from 1905 to 1911. After 1911 the company produced trucks exclusively and achieved a great deal of success for decades.

1937 Diamond T Pickup

1937 Diamond T Pickup

Strong Truck Sales Even During the 1930's

During the 1930's Diamond T was selling more trucks than both White Motor Company and Mack. Diamond T was fifth behind the big three automakers and International. Many manufacturers experienced very difficult times during the Great Depression years but Diamond T actually had record sales of over 4,100 trucks during the 1933 model year. The company was very well known for their quality medium and heavy-duty trucks. It's been said that Diamond T actually outsold many rivals because their trucks looked better. In other words, Diamond T successfully integrated heavy truck design with style.

Two things many truck enthusiasts point to about the Diamond T truck design are the distinctive grille bars and the top open

Diamond T Model 80

Diamond T Model 80

ing side hood panels secured by plated clamps. Design changes at Diamond T really began during the 1920's when trucks were not known for their styling. In fact, trucks were known for anything but smart styling until Diamond T started redesigning. Diamond T was really the leader in changing the appearance of medium and heavy-duty vehicles and probably the best example of their restyling came out in 1933.

A Big Military Supplier

Diamond T's reputation was as a builder of heavier trucks, typically one ton and larger. The company built what most considered quality heavy trucks with style. During the First World War Diamond T built more than 1,500 Liberty Trucks for the military. During World War Two, when the company produced over 50,000 vehicles, many of these vehicles were purchased by the British Purchasing Commission. This included half-tracks, army wreckers, tank tractors, and tank movers.

Stylish Diamond T nameplate on side of hood

Stylish Diamond T nameplate on side of hood

The White Motor Company purchased Diamond T in 1958. In 1960 White moved all production from Chicago to Reo's manufacturing facilities in Lansing, Michigan. The Lansing Division of White Motor Company then produced both Diamond T and Reo trucks. Starting in 1967 the two trucks became one. No longer were two separate brands being built. This move created White's new Diamond Reo Division in 1967 and they began producing Diamond Reo trucks.

1937 Diamond T Model 80 Pickup Truck Specifications

The 1937 Diamond T Pickup was built with a six cylinder Hercules QX Series engine. Hercules was established in 1915 in Canton Ohio. The Hercules engines soon became the standard for independent truck manufacturers. Hercules also built engines for the marine, oil and  farming industries. During World War Two it's said that Hercules was sending about 18,000 engines per month off their assembly lines.

The 1937 Diamond T's had bow fronted grills along with new and broad fenders. The windshield was at a 30-degree angle. The dash panel with its large diameter “airplane type” instruments was largely from the 1935 model. Another feature with the 1937 Diamond T Pickup was an electric clock on the dash. You would not have found that on another truck brand in 1937. Also on the dash was a cigarette lighter.

1937 Diamond T sloping windshield, wide fenders and hood clamps

1937 Diamond T sloping windshield, wide fenders and hood clamps

In addition to this, in 1937 Diamond T would offer options to the truck buyer, one of which was oversize chrome hubcaps. This is another example how Diamond T used styling to help beat competitors.

The 1937 model came out with a three speed manual transmission.The truck had a weight of about 8,000 lbs with a spring suspension.

The Diamond T Model 80 Pickup had a wheelbase of 119.0 inches and up to a bit over 9 feet of loading space.

Three additional AutoMuseumOnline photo articles you'll enjoy of classic trucks and cars are on the links below.

The 1938 Ford Half-Ton Pickup

The 1935 Chevrolet Half-Ton Truck

Original 1935 Chevrolet Standard Coupe

 

The Collector's 1937 Diamond T Pickup Truck

The Diamond T's were one of a kind trucks and they are valuable collector's vehicles. The Diamond T 1937 Model 80 Pickup is a rare vehicle these days and it's always a big hit when one is displayed at a car show. Prices asked at auction could be as high as the $40,000 area depending on degree and quality of restoration. If you locate a Diamond T Model 80, unrestored but drivable, which isn't easy, you might be asked to pay in the $8,000 to $14,000 range.

(Article and photos copyright 2013 AutoMuseumOnline)